Critter CareWhat is the best way to reduce the migration of airborne chemicals?

Although not always detected by the human eye or nose, cleaning chemicals or disinfectants that are sprayed on one side of the room can migrate to the other side. Simply moving animals from cages on one side of the room to the other, during the cleaning process, may not remove them from the path of airborne chemical vapors.

Bleach, as well as other chemicals with strong odors and/or vapors can trigger the start of upper respiratory illness in kittens and other sensitive animals (and humans). Airborne chemicals can also exacerbate an already existing upper respiratory illness, such as in dogs showing symptoms of kennel cough or canine influenza. Here are few ideas for reducing the migration of airborne chemicals:

How to use Airborne Chemicals

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Most commercial spray nozzles offer three settings; A: Off – B: Spray – C: Course. Using the Spray setting (B) will allow the chemical vapors to migrate from one area of the room to the next. If the cleaning protocol requires a spray application we recommend using the Course setting (C). This allows for the chemical to be directed to the surface, reducing the amount of chemical vapor that can migrate from one area to the next.

1. Replace spray bottles with a wet wipe system:

Most commercial spray nozzles offer three settings; A: Off – B: Spray – C: Course. Using the Spray setting (B) will allow the chemical vapors to migrate from one area of the room to the next. If the cleaning protocol requires a spray application we recommend using the Course setting (C). This allows for the chemical to be directed to the surface, reducing the amount of chemical vapor that can migrate from one area to the next.

For more information, please call 1-800-869-4789 or visit www.provetlogic.com